March302014
2PM

Top 10 sexist and heterosexist moments in Caribbean Politics

Contribute to the final list of top 10 sexist & heterosexist moments in Caribbean politics by leaving your suggestions in the comments below.  

January22014
Thinkers, artists, writers, bloggers wanted.  Join the Caribbean Blog Carnival and build community across the region & diaspora.  For theme & details click here.  If you see this, please re-blog.

Thinkers, artists, writers, bloggers wanted.  Join the Caribbean Blog Carnival and build community across the region & diaspora.  For theme & details click here.  If you see this, please re-blog.

December262013

Best of the 2013 Caribbean Feminist Blogosphere

Travel across the islands and territories of the Caribbean and its diaspora and sample some of the best feminist blogging out there. 

What have Caribbean feminist women and men written about in 2013? Love, fashion, motherhood, being mixed-race, surviving…

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December142013

Scarred

Scarred http://wp.me/sSQ7E-scarred

Guest post

Good evening. Allow me to introduce myself. I am Elmer, 22 year old Belizean youth that comes from a humble yet hard working family. Today it is important for me to share my story with you. I am speaking on the impact that my mother’s teenage…

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October272013

Caribbean Cyberfeminisms

I’m working on a research project on Caribbean Cyberfeminisms and I’m looking for Caribbean feminist tumblrs & blogs from across the multi-lingual Caribbean and the diaspora.

I’ve blogged about the top 10 Caribbean feminist blog posts and Digital Feminist Activism in a Post-Feminist Age. Now I’m seeking to complete a much larger research project.

Thanks for collaborating & please re-blog.

I can be reached on tumblr or at redforgender [at] gmail [dot] com

July72013

The current state of the law throughout much of the region and the practice in Barbados require urgent reform to treat the abuse of ALL children, as a class of criminality that deserves its own treatment as an act against our collective humanity and deserving the highest levels of opprobium.

In so doing however, the law ought to treat to the sexual abuse of children, in the instant case the abuse of boys, as conceptually distinct from the consensual sexual relations between adults.

CODE RED for gender justice examines the double injustice of the Caribbean’s buggery laws. Read full article here.
February152013
June182012
Caribbean feminism is not some giant hairy man-eating monster anxious to claw its way to the top and destroy the family and society in the process. It’s a movement of ordinary diverse women (and men) like the ones I had the privilege of spending two days with: passionate, courageous and committed to being the change they want to see.
A CODE RED for gender justice! member talks about why she’s a feminist. Read the full Outlish Magazine article here.
CODE RED is a Caribbean feminist activist collective. Find us on facebook or follow us on twitter.

Caribbean feminism is not some giant hairy man-eating monster anxious to claw its way to the top and destroy the family and society in the process. It’s a movement of ordinary diverse women (and men) like the ones I had the privilege of spending two days with: passionate, courageous and committed to being the change they want to see.

A CODE RED for gender justice! member talks about why she’s a feminist. Read the full Outlish Magazine article here.

CODE RED is a Caribbean feminist activist collective. Find us on facebook or follow us on twitter.

May232012
May212012

How we ah go mek dis movement move? Reflections from the CatchAFyah Caribbean Feminist Grounding

We’ll be posting a much more serious and sober report later but here are some quick reflections from a few of the Catch a Fire participants.

On Transformation

Day 1 of our Caribbean Feminist Grounding was really (personally) transformative. Something Shifted. Something Changed. And maybe I just needed y’all to remind me *why* and to think together (creatively) through the *how’s*. Thank you sisters for re-igniting the flame! Sistrens, how we ah go mek dis movement move??!?!

On Community

I often wish I lived on a deserted island far away from people. But now, I want to live in a commune with the amazing, fiery, beautiful women of Caribbean Feminists CatchAFyah! So I’m just going to think of the Caribbean as my commune ;P Two quotes from Audre Lorde are resonating as I reflect and return to the work: “Without community there is no liberation, only the most vulnerable and temporary armistice between an individual and her oppression.” Also- “Revolution is not a one-time event. It is becoming always vigilant for the smallest opportunity to make a genuine change.” We are stronger, more effective together. 1 ♥

On Sisterhood Across Difference

Someone asked me what the other ladies at Catch A Fire were like. I said they were like me! Even though we are certainly very unique individuals, it was great to feel that sisterhood among us. And somewhere within ourselves, we are all feminists who have caught a fyah…

On Privilege

Though not necessarily individually, we were a privileged group. We were funded, had a comfortable meeting space (that was not wheelchair accessible) and among us were many a university degree. That in itself is a disconnect from large numbers of women and men our work seeks support and empower. Even those words, support and empower are problematic… Though raised, the challenge remains, how do we make it different for our next meeting? For our next project(s)? For our work? Class privilege is unwieldy dammit!

I have been in many queer positive spaces in my life. Both in the Caribbean and in North America. This was yet another one of them which was lovely. I have enjoyed straight privilege most of my life however I am mostly read as queer outside of being in a relationship with men. Many womyn in the group identified as lgbtqi and spoke to their experience. However very few (myself included) spoke to their experience of straightness. I greatly appreciated a post my another member who spoke to this silence post-meeting which so beautifully encapsulated how I feel about my own sexuality which makes me simultaneously shy away from labeling myself (b/c it’s so much more complex than any label but also want to identify/name) and speak to the privilege of straightness. (via Add Fyah And Stir. read entire post here.)

On Inspiration

This was [an] amazing 3 days. The insights, spirits, comments and inspiration to go on is willed. The time is now, the opportunity is here. … i just cant stop talking about next step. A fyah was certainly caught in Barbados. GET F’ED UP!!!!!

Thank you SISTAS

On Inter-generational & South-South Learning

The selection of participants I believe indeed contributed greatly to the grounding. The fact that participants presented on issues and assisted with managing the group over the two days. Having Dr. Antrobus and other invited guest from DAWN and Red Thread was also inspiring and added motivation as to why my involvement was one to be proud of.

On Safe Spaces

I loved the women that attended. All so powerful, interesting, and inspiring. The opportunity and space to meet like-minded persons with an interest in changing the status quo. I also deeply appreciated the safeness of the space, I love that women could be open and honest about who they are and without fear. And the food was amazing!


Visit CODE RED for gender justice on wordpress, facebook and twitter to learn more about CatchAFyah.

Connect with us by completing the online sign-up sheet to join the CatchAFyah Caribbean Feminist Network.

May92012
Delegates from Barbados and Jamaica in deep conversation.
From Istanbul to Barbados and across the Caribbean.  Reflections on the Caribbean presence at the AWID Forum and updates on Catch a Fire: the region’s first ever young feminist meet-up!
Follow #CatchAFyah for updates on this historic meeting which brings together representatives from youth, women’s, LGBT and feminist organisations from Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Haiti, Grenada, Guyana, St.Lucia, St. Kitts & Nevis, Trinidad & Tobago, Jamaica and St. Vincent & the Grenadines.
CODE RED is a feminist collective of Caribbean women and men.  Join us on facebook or follow us on twitter.

Delegates from Barbados and Jamaica in deep conversation.

From Istanbul to Barbados and across the Caribbean.  Reflections on the Caribbean presence at the AWID Forum and updates on Catch a Fire: the region’s first ever young feminist meet-up!

Follow #CatchAFyah for updates on this historic meeting which brings together representatives from youth, women’s, LGBT and feminist organisations from Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Haiti, Grenada, Guyana, St.Lucia, St. Kitts & Nevis, Trinidad & Tobago, Jamaica and St. Vincent & the Grenadines.

CODE RED is a feminist collective of Caribbean women and men.  Join us on facebook or follow us on twitter.

April292012
Catch A Fire!
Ignite the imagination.
Ideas & Action for social change.
It’s not a meeting. It’s a movement.
A new generation of Caribbean feminists will meet in Barbados for two intense days to strategise on how to collaborate regionally, strengthen feminist voices and initiatives in the region as well as mobilise around key issues like sexual and reproductive health and rights.
This is just the beginning for this group which includes members of traditional women’s organisations, regional feminist organisations, LBGT and youth organisations as well as women’s health organisations.
We are social entrepreneurs, peer educators, community activists, volunteers, gender and development professionals, a doctor working on rural women’s health, the coordinator of the young feminist fund, students, teachers, advocates, artists.
We come from Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, Trinidad & Tobago and the Caribbean diaspora.
We recognise the need to reach out further within our own communities and across the other territories of the English, Spanish, French and Dutch-speaking Caribbean.
Watch this space for updates and to learn how you can get involved.
CODE RED is a feminist collective of Caribbean women and men.  Re-blog to help us get the word out!

Catch A Fire!

Ignite the imagination.

Ideas & Action for social change.

It’s not a meeting. It’s a movement.

A new generation of Caribbean feminists will meet in Barbados for two intense days to strategise on how to collaborate regionally, strengthen feminist voices and initiatives in the region as well as mobilise around key issues like sexual and reproductive health and rights.

This is just the beginning for this group which includes members of traditional women’s organisations, regional feminist organisations, LBGT and youth organisations as well as women’s health organisations.

We are social entrepreneurs, peer educators, community activists, volunteers, gender and development professionals, a doctor working on rural women’s health, the coordinator of the young feminist fund, students, teachers, advocates, artists.

We come from Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, Trinidad & Tobago and the Caribbean diaspora.

We recognise the need to reach out further within our own communities and across the other territories of the English, Spanish, French and Dutch-speaking Caribbean.

Watch this space for updates and to learn how you can get involved.

CODE RED is a feminist collective of Caribbean women and men.  Re-blog to help us get the word out!

March132012
February72012
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